Why Do I Have to Blink So Much?

In most cases, people blink unconsciously. The blink reflex is spontaneous and generally happens so fast that it goes unnoticed. Most people would be hard-pressed to guess how many times they blink in the span of a minute. The “normal” number of blinks in a minute ranges from 15 times and 20 times, but of course, everyone is different. In general, you don’t have to worry if your blink rate is in the normal range. But there are times when your blinking is worth a second look.

When Blinking Changes Dramatically

If you all of a sudden notice that you need to blink a lot more or less than usual, you might want to see an eye doctor. Changes in blink rates can indicate that something is going on with your eyes.

For instance, you may develop a condition known as dry eyes. Dry eyes syndrome is a serious condition that means your eyes are not getting the moisture they need to be healthy. Dry eyes can be caused by:

  • Temporary external conditions
  • Physical deformity or malfunction in the eye
  • Eye injury
  • Lifestyle

If you notice that your blinking rate has increased or noticeably decreased, contact your eye doctor in Wilmington or Charlotte. Never ignore this development, as further damage to the eye could occur if it’s not treated promptly.

Computer Use and Blinking

A disturbing research report shows that people who use their computers for extended periods of time blink up to 66 percent less. You recall that blinking adds moisture to the surface of the eye, you can see that this lifestyle habit isn’t healthy. To prevent this occurrence, take regular breaks from the computer or at least look away at something in the distance.

Don’t ignore changes in your blinking habits. Your eye doctor in Charlotte or Wilmington will be able to help diagnose any problem and get you treated accordingly.

 

What Can I Do to Prevent Low Vision?

Low vision can impact your quality of life, so preventing it from occurring is the best thing you can do. While some people have a natural predisposition to develop low vision later in life, there are still many lifestyle habits you can assume that could help you avoid problems with low vision in later adulthood. Here’s what you need to know about preventing a problem relating to low vision.

Protect Your Eyes At Work

If you work in an environment that could be hazardous to your eyes – maybe because you’re regularly exposed to chemicals or flying debris – protect your eyes with proper protective equipment. Your employer will likely provide you with this protective equipment, and will probably train you to use it. If not, there are many guidelines on OSHA’s website that can provide you with instructions on how to protect your eyes in the workplace.

See the Eye Doctor Regularly

See the eye doctor on a regular basis to catch vision problems before they become severe. Make annual appointments to get an eye exam, even if you don’t currently need to wear glasses.

Don’t Smoke

You probably know that smoking is bad for your lungs – but did you know it’s bad for your eyes too? Research shows that smoking is linked to age-related macular degeneration. Avoid smoking to protect your vision.

Protect Your Eyes From the Sun

Wear sunglasses to protect your eyes from harmful UVA and UVB rays. Wear quality sunglasses that indicate they block the sun’s rays.

Concerned You Have Low Vision? Contact Your Eye Doctor

If you have symptoms of low vision, make an appointment to get a low vision evaluation from Dr. Edward Paul. Call today to schedule your exam and get low vision treatment that can improve your quality of life.

 

Most Common Causes of Low Vision

Low vision is a debilitating condition that affects millions of people worldwide. In Wilmington, NC, low vision impacts people in all different walks of life, of all ages. Sometimes low vision is genetic, but other times, it develops over time. If you can possibly prevent low vision from developing, you should, since low vision is often not reversible. Here are some common causes of low vision to be aware of.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a condition where pressure is placed on the eye and vision is reduced or lost. Glaucoma has no symptoms, so it’s essential that you have regular eye doctor visits, where you’ll receive a non-invasive glaucoma test.

Optic Nerve Hypoplasia

This is one of the causes of low vision that is inherited. It’s a condition that means the optic nerves are abnormally small. While optic nerve hypoplasia can’t be treated, there are ways that your Wilmington eye doctor can help improve your life with low vision.

Retinitis Pigmentosa

This is a condition that affects the color of the retina and causes low vision. It’s an inherited condition and is not treatable. However, if this is the case of your low vision, talk to you Wilmington eye doctor about your options for improving your quality of life.

Eye Injury

Traumatic eye injuries can cause low vision. In some cases, these injuries may heal and full vision may be restored. In other cases, eye doctor intervention is needed and certain treatments may help to bring back full vision.

Macular Degeneration

This can come on due to aging or a related condition such as diabetes, obesity, or other reasons. If caught early enough, treatment may halt the progression of low vision.

If you suspect that you are developing low vision, please contact our office in Wilmington, NC. We have a variety of options available to make life with low vision more manageable.

A Closer Look at the Leading Causes of Low Vision in Seniors

Roughly one out of every three people will have some type of issue that lowers their visual abilities by the time they reach the age of 65. As an aging adult, getting proactive about your visual health is important because of that fact. Here is a look at some of the leading causes of low vision in seniors.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma creates undue stress on the optic nerve, which can lead to blindness and changes to vision. Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness among seniors, but may not always lead to vision loss or blindness.

Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration is one of the leading causes of vision loss for individuals who are over the age of 60. When caught early, the condition can oftentimes be slowed with attentive treatment. However, the disease can cause permanent changes to your vision.

Cataracts

Roughly half of all adults will have cataracts by the time they reach the age of 80. Cataracts are a collection of proteins that can cause cloudiness on the lens of the eye. Your vision may appear hazy or blurred, and you may have problems seeing well in direct sunlight or in low lighting.

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy affects as many as 7.7 million adults in the United States and can be more prevalent among seniors with diabetes. Unstable blood sugar levels can cause blood vessels at the back of the retina to leak fluid into the eye, which affects visual abilities.

Look for Low Vision Rehabilitation in Charlotte, NC

Even though low vision can affect your day-to-day life, there may be solutions available that can help. Reach out to us at the office of Dr. Edward Paul, OD, Ph.D. to schedule an appointment for a consultation.

How to Make the Most of Your Remaining Vision

It can feel devastating to receive a professional diagnosis of low vision. You may be worried about your ability to perform your daily activities such as driving, supervising little ones, reading or even cooking. However, with the tips listed below, you can make the most of your remaining vision.

Decorate With Contrasting Colors

Discerning between colors is a common problem for those with low vision. If you decorate with contrasting colors it will make navigating your home much easier.

Use Bigger Fonts

When working on your computer, use the tools available to make all of the fonts larger. This will reduce eyestrain and help to protect your remaining vision.

Invest In Magnifying Lenses

Keep a few magnifying lenses around your home and in your purse or pocket. When you shop for groceries or need to read the small food labels or recipes in your kitchen, the magnifying lens will be your best friend.

Keep Everything In Its Place

If you always keep certain items in the same place, you won’t have to struggle to search for them around your home. Do the same thing with your automobile. Keep spare change, sunglasses and anything else that you commonly use in the same place, such as the middle console or the glove box.

Wear Only UV-Rated Sunglasses

UV light can damage your eyes. Make sure that you only wear either prescription sunglasses, or UV-rated sunglasses that you can buy over-the-counter. This will help to protect your remaining vision.

Move Things Closer

You don’t want to strain your eyes any more than necessary. If you’re fond of watching television, Move your TV and chair closer together so that you don’t have to squint in order to watch your favorite programs.

With some care and attention, you can ensure that you make the most of your remaining vision. For more information about low vision needs, please contact your eye doctor.