A Closer Look at the Leading Causes of Low Vision in Seniors

Roughly one out of every three people will have some type of issue that lowers their visual abilities by the time they reach the age of 65. As an aging adult, getting proactive about your visual health is important because of that fact. Here is a look at some of the leading causes of low vision in seniors.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma creates undue stress on the optic nerve, which can lead to blindness and changes to vision. Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness among seniors, but may not always lead to vision loss or blindness.

Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration is one of the leading causes of vision loss for individuals who are over the age of 60. When caught early, the condition can oftentimes be slowed with attentive treatment. However, the disease can cause permanent changes to your vision.

Cataracts

Roughly half of all adults will have cataracts by the time they reach the age of 80. Cataracts are a collection of proteins that can cause cloudiness on the lens of the eye. Your vision may appear hazy or blurred, and you may have problems seeing well in direct sunlight or in low lighting.

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy affects as many as 7.7 million adults in the United States and can be more prevalent among seniors with diabetes. Unstable blood sugar levels can cause blood vessels at the back of the retina to leak fluid into the eye, which affects visual abilities.

Look for Low Vision Rehabilitation in Charlotte, NC

Even though low vision can affect your day-to-day life, there may be solutions available that can help. Reach out to us at the office of Dr. Edward Paul, OD, Ph.D. to schedule an appointment for a consultation.

How to Make the Most of Your Remaining Vision

It can feel devastating to receive a professional diagnosis of low vision. You may be worried about your ability to perform your daily activities such as driving, supervising little ones, reading or even cooking. However, with the tips listed below, you can make the most of your remaining vision.

Decorate With Contrasting Colors

Discerning between colors is a common problem for those with low vision. If you decorate with contrasting colors it will make navigating your home much easier.

Use Bigger Fonts

When working on your computer, use the tools available to make all of the fonts larger. This will reduce eyestrain and help to protect your remaining vision.

Invest In Magnifying Lenses

Keep a few magnifying lenses around your home and in your purse or pocket. When you shop for groceries or need to read the small food labels or recipes in your kitchen, the magnifying lens will be your best friend.

Keep Everything In Its Place

If you always keep certain items in the same place, you won’t have to struggle to search for them around your home. Do the same thing with your automobile. Keep spare change, sunglasses and anything else that you commonly use in the same place, such as the middle console or the glove box.

Wear Only UV-Rated Sunglasses

UV light can damage your eyes. Make sure that you only wear either prescription sunglasses, or UV-rated sunglasses that you can buy over-the-counter. This will help to protect your remaining vision.

Move Things Closer

You don’t want to strain your eyes any more than necessary. If you’re fond of watching television, Move your TV and chair closer together so that you don’t have to squint in order to watch your favorite programs.

With some care and attention, you can ensure that you make the most of your remaining vision. For more information about low vision needs, please contact your eye doctor.